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26

Aug

I am and I was so I will forever be, only because with life theirs one soul attached to me so when you see that “I” was you will instantly Know that it was me and all the creativity I was unable to take along with me is what you will see
Edward Grant

25

Aug

dictatoroftxste:

RAW Concepts 

Photo Cred: brandnmc

dictatoroftxste:

RAW Concepts

Photo Cred: brandnmc

23

Aug

My history is black

Run nigger

The day is coming
Freedom is leaving
The niggers are grieving
Life is over as fast as women are conceiving
The 60’s return the whitey is leading
Once again to live means fear
Sharp discreet whispers but all you hear is RUN NIGGER RUN RUN NIGGER RUN
The laws and human rights revealed its natural form as a GUN…. Run run run run!!!🚱🚷🚯🚫
All you see is colored faces no plural races pleading “Don’t shoot”👐
Blackman drugged up and high talking to himself from the whiteman supply
You haven’t lived until you’ve heard bullets swim the air
I’m black we’re black we started in Africa we didn’t ask to be here

22

Aug

(Source: bisoushells)

20

Aug

(Source: complexmagazine)

thechanelmuse:

Meth and ODB. This makes me sad…

thechanelmuse:

Meth and ODB. This makes me sad…

17

Aug

Charlotte Bridges Forten Grimké (August 17, 1837 – July 23, 1914) was an African-American anti-slavery activist, poet, and educator. She grew up in a prominent abolitionist family in Philadelphia. She taught school for years, including during the war to freedmen in South Carolina. Later in life she married Francis James Grimké, a Presbyterian minister who led a major church in Washington, DC for decades. He was a nephew of the abolitionist Grimké sisters and active in civil rights.

Her diaries written before the end of the Civil War have been published in numerous editions in the 20th century as The Journal of Charlotte Forten; the work is significant as a record of the life of a free black woman in the North in the antebellum years.

References 

Bio: “Charlotte L. Forten Grimke”, Poetry Foundation
“Seaside Plantation, Beaufort County (S.C. Sec. Rd. 77, St. Helena Island)”. National Register Properties in South Carolina. South Carolina Department of Archives and History. Retrieved 25 February 2014.
Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 13, No. 79, May 1864
National Historic Landmarks Program
The Journal of Charlotte Forten: A Free Negro in the Slave Era, New York: Norton, 1981.
The Journals of Charlotte Forten, New York: Oxford Press, 1988

Charlotte Bridges Forten Grimké (August 17, 1837 – July 23, 1914) was an African-American anti-slavery activist, poet, and educator. She grew up in a prominent abolitionist family in Philadelphia. She taught school for years, including during the war to freedmen in South Carolina. Later in life she married Francis James Grimké, a Presbyterian minister who led a major church in Washington, DC for decades. He was a nephew of the abolitionist Grimké sisters and active in civil rights.

Her diaries written before the end of the Civil War have been published in numerous editions in the 20th century as The Journal of Charlotte Forten; the work is significant as a record of the life of a free black woman in the North in the antebellum years.

References

Bio: “Charlotte L. Forten Grimke”, Poetry Foundation
“Seaside Plantation, Beaufort County (S.C. Sec. Rd. 77, St. Helena Island)”. National Register Properties in South Carolina. South Carolina Department of Archives and History. Retrieved 25 February 2014.
Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 13, No. 79, May 1864
National Historic Landmarks Program
The Journal of Charlotte Forten: A Free Negro in the Slave Era, New York: Norton, 1981.
The Journals of Charlotte Forten, New York: Oxford Press, 1988

I control my own conjectures my mind isn’t the result of no one’s creativity.

16

Aug

(Source: voguewars)